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What Could it Mean if Your Kids Snoring?

What Could it Mean if Your Kids Snoring?

Should you ignore or seek treatment for your kids snoring? The problem could be more serious than you think. Kids snoring? Don’t ignore the snore Snoring can be a problem for families and couples. It’s the source of many restless nights – particularly if you’re the person who has to hear it! But is there a hidden danger in our kids snoring that we’re not aware of? What are the medical risks associated with kids snoring? A recent study conducted by the Monash University of Melbourne at the new Monash Children’s Hospital sought to examine the health consequences associated with snoring in childhood. Alarmingly, it was revealed that the older children in the study (those aged 7-12) for the most part exhibited increased blood pressure levels. The kids snoring also showed increased levels of poor behaviour than their snore-free peers as well as lower levels of intellectual ability. The study took place over a four-year period so the more far-reaching impacts of childhood snoring aren’t yet known. Based on these figures, however, it appears that the physical changes the brain experiences during snoring mean it can only access lower levels of oxygen. This can have lasting impact on cognitive and physical function. How do I treat my kids snoring? If your house is full of kids snoring, it’s best to seek treatment sooner rather than later. A visit to your GP is recommended as a first port of call. It’s there that you’ll receive a referral to an ENT (Ear, Nose and Throat) specialist. There are a few options for treatment depending on the severity of the problem. Some snoring issues may be solved with a course of steroids. Nasal spray is usually preferred as a treatment for children as opposed to tablets which can be quite harsh. Skin prick testing to see if the cause is allergen-based may also take place. For more severe cases surgery on the tonsils or adenoids may be the outcome. Why are my kids snoring? There may be a number of reasons why your children are snoring which will be explored by your medical professional. Some of these may be hereditary or environmental. A calm, considered approach on the advice of your doctor will be able to unpack the cause and determine best...

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A Day in The Life of a Dental Assistant

A Day in The Life of a Dental Assistant

The blue walls of the waiting room usually have a calming effect on patients but Mr T is different. The older gentleman exhibits some visual indicators of stress – he’s clearly nervous about his upcoming appointment. Luckily, Rachael Sorraghan knows just how to set his mind at ease. The job of a dental assistant is never done. “Mostly I suck spit all day”, Rachael claims, but it’s easy to see there’s so much more to it than that. There’s a certain something about the way she interacts with her patients that sets this practice, with Rachael at the helm as senior dental assistant, apart from others. Patients whose anxiety about dental procedures would normally make a visit like this a traumatic experience leave the practice calm and cared for. Just the way this senior dental assistant likes it. Rachael holds a Certificate III in Dental Assisting. She thoroughly enjoys the challenge of juggling the needs of patients with ensuring that she always provides the utmost professional support to the dentists. There’s an art to it – predicting how long a procedure will take, anticipating the emotional and physical support a patient will require and always maintaining an atmosphere of calm. It’s a combination of the personal and the professional that Rachael does so well and that really makes a difference in the lives of her patients. She remembers with fondness an elderly patient, Mrs M, who has since passed away. They formed such a close and real bond that, prior to Rachael embarking on an overseas trip, Mrs M gifted her with a St Christopher’s medal to keep her safe. Their close bond reminded the dental assistant of her own grandmother and she counts the impact that each woman had on the lives of the other as a career highlight. As with any other job, there are parts of being a dental assistant that Rachael both loves and loathes. Preparation for crowns is her favourite part – the opportunity to have extended interaction and engagement with a patient and use her expertise is a task she’ll gladly take on. Assisting with root canals, however, doesn’t exactly put a spring in her step. You can be assured, though, that she’ll support her patients no matter what. As she leads Mr T from the waiting room into the examination room it’s with a firm, friendly confidence that slows his heart rate down and puts a smile on his face. She’ll stay with him until he leaves and walk him to his car – it’s just what she...

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