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What Makes A Good Kids Dentist?

What Makes A Good Kids Dentist?

What REALLY Makes A Good Kids’ Dentist Searching for a great kids’ dentist can be like searching for the elusive needle in the haystack. With so many dentists to choose from, parents may wonder exactly what they should be looking for? The way your child feels about their first experiences at the dentist will set the scene for their outlook about dental visits for the rest of their lives! Choosing an experienced dentist ensures they have a positive experience from the beginning to secure a lifetime of good oral health. Easing dental anxiety for your child Children are often apprehensive about visiting the dentist. If it is their first time, the chair, tools and noises can seem overwhelming and even scary for a young child. If they have visited before and had an unfavourable experience, this can make it even more difficult for a subsequent visit! Kids are not the only ones facing dental anxiety, of course; many adults have similar fears (which ironically often began in childhood!) A great dentist is well equipped to handle dental anxiety in people of ALL ages, from the youngest member of the family to the oldest. A gentle and caring approach is a prerequisite for any great dentist, and this extends to the dental assistants, hygienists and reception staff. From the moment you walk in the door with your child, you should be made to feel at ease. Working slowly and carefully, an experienced, child-friendly dentist will take the time and care required to make your child’s appointment as pleasant as possible, ensuring their comfort at all times. It is important that the dentist builds the trust of your child, making them laugh and feel comfortable in their surroundings – as well as the trust of the parent! Tips for your child’s dental visit Finding a quality, experienced and personable dentist is essential for your child. In addition, you can do the following to help make the experience a positive one: Read children’s books about visiting the dentist. Play make believe dentist visits at home and talk about the chair, tools and noises. Only talk about the dentist in a positive way in front of your child. Cheerful kid’s music in the background can help your child to feel at ease during their visit. The gentle kids’ dentist Robert Duhig has a long-held reputation in Sandgate as the “gentle dentist”, and for good reason! After 28 years of running his own practice, Rob provides the highest standard of service for the families he looks after. His extensive experience and gentle approach make him a trusted kids’ dentist, and a friendly, approachable dentist for people of all ages. If you are looking for...

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What To Do If Your Child Knocks Out A Tooth!

What To Do If Your Child Knocks Out A Tooth!

What To Do If Your Child Knocks Out A Tooth If your child knocks out his or her tooth, it can be a pretty scary situation for both you and your young one. What do you do, and how can you prevent any further damage to your child’s teeth? We’ve got a few simple steps for you to follow to ensure your child keeps their big, beautiful smile! Is it a baby tooth? If it’s a baby tooth that’s been knocked out, don’t worry – the situation is not quite as severe as with a permanent tooth. You still need to bring your child in to the dentist to have them examined, but there probably won’t be any treatment required. The dentist might decide to use a spacer to ensure that any teeth coming in don’t fill up the gap caused by the missing tooth, which could create further problems later on in your child’s life. What you definitely do not want to do is to try to re-insert the tooth back into the socket – you could damage any permanent teeth under the gum line. Provide pain relief in the form of over the counter medication and cold packs to make sure your child stays as comfortable as possible until their dentist appointment. Is it a permanent or adult tooth? If your child has knocked out a permanent tooth, get them in to see the dentist immediately. Time is of the essence! Make sure you search the area thoroughly until you find the tooth, and then follow these simple steps:  Only handle the tooth by the crown (the exposed part of the tooth) and gently rinse it with water. Do not scrub it or use anything else to clean it as you may damage it further. You can either a) re-insert it back into the socket and hold it in place with gauze, or b) place it in a glass of milk for transportation to the dentist. Do not wrap it in a serviette or place it in glass of water! Call your dentist immediately – you need to act very quickly if you want to save the tooth. After hours care is available if you need it. If you can’t locate the tooth, there is a chance your child may have swallowed it. You might need to contact your child’s doctor and have an x-ray performed If there’s any facial swelling or pain, you can use cold packs and over the counter medication to make your child more comfortable until they see the dentist. If you child knocks out a tooth, don’t panic! No matter how much blood they lose or pain they’re in, you experienced dentist...

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What Happens When An Adult Tooth Comes In Behind a Baby Tooth?

What Happens When An Adult Tooth Comes In Behind a Baby Tooth?

What Happens When An Adult Tooth Comes In Behind A Baby Tooth? The loss of one of your child’s baby teeth is usually a very exciting time! They may have a tall tale to tell about how it came out and be awaiting a visit from the Tooth Fairy. However, it can become frustrating if the baby tooth refuses to budge. You may even notice another tooth beginning to grow from behind it. If you notice an adult tooth growing behind a baby tooth, don’t be alarmed! There is an explanation for this. How does it happen? Most of the time adult teeth come up underneath baby teeth, forcing them to fall out. This is how we end up with our permanent set of teeth. Sometimes an adult tooth will form and grow behind a baby tooth. Also known as shark teeth, this is a condition that can occur when the baby tooth takes a prolonged time to fall out or if the child’s mouth is crowded. It may look unusual, but this is a far more common occurrence than you may think it. Around 10% of children will experience an adult tooth coming in behind a baby tooth. It’s most common in six to seven year old children, around their lower and upper front teeth. Should I be worried? If you notice an adult tooth behind your child’s baby tooth, don’t panic! The best thing you can do is to encourage your child to wiggle the baby tooth with side to side motions and twisting. This will help coax the tooth to fall out and allow the adult tooth space to move. The only problem that can occur is if the baby tooth refuses to come out even after trying to coax it out manually. If you find that the baby tooth hasn’t budged after a few weeks, contact us at Robert Duhig Dental for advice. What happens if the adult tooth is crooked? Once the baby tooth falls out on its own, the adult tooth may appear to be crooked. This isn’t a serious concern as the tooth can correct its position over time. This tooth adjusting process can take up to a year. However, if your child has a crowded mouth, they may need assistance in the teeth straightening process. At Robert Duhig, we can provide helpful advice on what to do if your child needs their teeth straightened. Robert Duhig Dental understands the gentle process needed when it comes to providing dentistry for kids. Located on Brisbane’s north side, we provide dentistry that will help care for your child’s baby and permanent teeth. If you notice an adult tooth growing behind a baby tooth that...

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Teeth Eruption Timetable For Baby And Adult Teeth

Teeth Eruption Timetable For Baby And Adult Teeth

Teeth Eruption Timetable For Baby And Adult Teeth Teething. It’s every parent’s nightmare but an essential part of childhood growth and development. The following teeth eruption timetable will help to give you an idea of when and what to expect with your child’s teething. Like any milestone, the teeth eruption timetable is a rough guide; some children will teeth earlier or later than others. Some babies are already sporting a few shiny white teeth when they’re born! Baby vs adult teeth For most babies, their very first tooth will emerge around 6-8 months of age. They tend to emerge in pairs at either the top or the bottom. As a general rule, there will be four teeth erupting every six months until they have a total of twenty baby teeth: ten in the top and ten in the bottom at around the age of three. Baby teeth are also referred to as primary or deciduous teeth and will begin to slowly fall out, making room for permanent adult teeth from the ages of six to thirteen. The very last adult teeth to emerge, usually between seventeen to twenty one years of age, are the third molars or wisdom teeth. There are thirty two permanent adult teeth. Baby or primary: 6 months to 3 years Baby or primary teeth usually begin to emerge in pairs around the age of 6 months. The very first teeth that break through your baby’s gums between 6-10 months will typically be both front bottom teeth, known as central incisors. Their matching top central incisors should be the next teeth to emerge around 8-12 months. The teeth on each side of the front incisors, called the lateral incisors, are next to break through. This starts with the top pair this time, around 9-13 months, shortly followed by the bottom lateral incisors between 10-16 months. Next come the canine or cuspid teeth between 16-23 months. The upper canines will usually erupt first, followed quickly by the bottom pair. Then come the very first set of molars at 13-19 months. Finally, the second molars are the last on the teeth eruption timetable and appear between 2 to 3 years. Then there’s a break of three to four years before the adult teeth begin to appear. Adult teeth: 6 to 12 years Shortly after the age of four, you’ll probably start to notice some major changes in the shape of your child’s face and gaps appearing between their baby teeth. This is due to their jaw and facial bones growing and creating space in their jaw for their thirty two permanent adult teeth, which begin to appear around the age of six to seven. Baby or primary teeth...

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